yunuen:

fake movies: avengers lady centric au (for nyssa)

Peggy is the one to get stuck in ice in and survive the century. Pepper doesn’t get rid of Extremis and becomes Rescue. Bruce Banner stays under the radar leaving Betty as the authority in gamma radiation. Jane retains some of the Aether’s powers. Thor is busy ruling Asgard, therefore Sif is the one tasked to retrieve the Tesseract. Director Fury rounds them all up along with Black Widow for his Avengers Initiative and, Barton being compromised, Maria Hill steps up as the marksman of the team. 

tldr; the ladies save the world instead

Goddamned right! I need this!!!

(via whedonesque)

nodaybuttodaytodefygravity:

gr4y-cl0uds:

itsflooo:

nateriot:

Obama on gay adoption 

You the man

fucking beautiful


yeah totally ruining this country what a horrible guy

nodaybuttodaytodefygravity:

gr4y-cl0uds:

itsflooo:

nateriot:

Obama on gay adoption 

You the man

fucking beautiful

image

yeah totally ruining this country what a horrible guy

(Source: holymaurymotherofgod, via manicpixiedreamqueen)

“The prince fought valiantly.
He slayed the dragon.
The princess cried for days.
She loved that dragon.”

The stories fairytales don’t tell (via shy-fawn)

(Source: caliginosity-, via manicpixiedreamqueen)

wired:

theatlantic:

The Quiet Radicalism of All That

The ’90s were golden years for Nickelodeon. The children’s cable television network was home to now cult-classic shows like Are You Afraid of the Dark? (1991-2000), Clarissa Explains It All (1991-’94), The Secret Life of Alex Mack (1994-’98), and Salute Your Shorts (1991-’92)—arguably heretofore unmatched in their clever, un-condescending approach to entertaining young people. Nick News with Linda Ellerbee launched in 1992, and remains to this day one of the only shows on-air devoted to frank, engaging discussions of teen issues and opinions.
But perhaps the program that best embodied the values of Nick in those years was All That, a sketch-comedy show that premiered 20 years ago today. Created by Brian Robbins and Mike Tollin, All That ran for an impressive 10 seasons before it was canceled in 2005. The prolific franchise spawned a number of spin-offs (Good Burger, Kenan & Kel, The Amanda Show) and launched the careers of several comedy mainstays: Kenan Thompson, Amanda Bynes, Nick Cannon, and Taran Killam.
Like Saturday Night Live (which would later hire Thompson and Killam), All That was a communal pop-cultural touchstone. The parents of ’90s kids had the Church Lady, “more cowbell,” and Roseanne Roseannadanna; the kids themselves, though, had Pierre Escargot, “Vital Information,” and Repairman Man Man Man, and we recited their catch-phrases to one another in the cafeteria and on the playground. Although All That was clearly designed as a SNL, Jr., of sorts, it wasn’t merely starter sketch comedy—it was an admittedly daring venture for a children’s network to embark on.
In its own right, All That was a weirdly subversive little show. It never explicitly crossed the line into “mature” territory, but it constantly flirted with the limits of FCC-approved family-friendliness. Take, for instance, the “Ask Ashley” sketch. A barely tween-aged Amanda Bynes (Seasons Three to Six), played an adorably wide-eyed video advice-columnist. Ashley (“That’s me!”) would read painfully dimwitted letters from fans with clearly solvable problems. (Example: “Dear Ashley, I live in a two-story house and my room is upstairs. Every morning, when it’s time to go to school, I jump out the window. So far I’ve broken my leg 17 times. Do you have any helpful suggestions for me?”) She would wait a beat, smile sweetly into the camera, then fly into a manic rage; emitting a stream of G-rated curses, always tantalizingly on the verge of spitting a true obscenity into the mix.
Read more. [Image: Nickelodeon]


They don’t make kid’s shows like they used to — not only in regards to actual content, but also in reference to the diversity of the casting.
Those were the days.

wired:

theatlantic:

The Quiet Radicalism of All That

The ’90s were golden years for Nickelodeon. The children’s cable television network was home to now cult-classic shows like Are You Afraid of the Dark? (1991-2000), Clarissa Explains It All (1991-’94), The Secret Life of Alex Mack (1994-’98), and Salute Your Shorts (1991-’92)—arguably heretofore unmatched in their clever, un-condescending approach to entertaining young people. Nick News with Linda Ellerbee launched in 1992, and remains to this day one of the only shows on-air devoted to frank, engaging discussions of teen issues and opinions.

But perhaps the program that best embodied the values of Nick in those years was All That, a sketch-comedy show that premiered 20 years ago today. Created by Brian Robbins and Mike Tollin, All That ran for an impressive 10 seasons before it was canceled in 2005. The prolific franchise spawned a number of spin-offs (Good Burger, Kenan & Kel, The Amanda Show) and launched the careers of several comedy mainstays: Kenan Thompson, Amanda Bynes, Nick Cannon, and Taran Killam.

Like Saturday Night Live (which would later hire Thompson and Killam), All That was a communal pop-cultural touchstone. The parents of ’90s kids had the Church Lady, “more cowbell,” and Roseanne Roseannadanna; the kids themselves, though, had Pierre Escargot, “Vital Information,” and Repairman Man Man Man, and we recited their catch-phrases to one another in the cafeteria and on the playground. Although All That was clearly designed as a SNL, Jr., of sorts, it wasn’t merely starter sketch comedy—it was an admittedly daring venture for a children’s network to embark on.

In its own right, All That was a weirdly subversive little show. It never explicitly crossed the line into “mature” territory, but it constantly flirted with the limits of FCC-approved family-friendliness. Take, for instance, the “Ask Ashley” sketch. A barely tween-aged Amanda Bynes (Seasons Three to Six), played an adorably wide-eyed video advice-columnist. Ashley (“That’s me!”) would read painfully dimwitted letters from fans with clearly solvable problems. (Example: “Dear Ashley, I live in a two-story house and my room is upstairs. Every morning, when it’s time to go to school, I jump out the window. So far I’ve broken my leg 17 times. Do you have any helpful suggestions for me?”) She would wait a beat, smile sweetly into the camera, then fly into a manic rage; emitting a stream of G-rated curses, always tantalizingly on the verge of spitting a true obscenity into the mix.

Read more. [Image: Nickelodeon]

They don’t make kid’s shows like they used to — not only in regards to actual content, but also in reference to the diversity of the casting.

Those were the days.

(via manicpixiedreamqueen)

Nearly 100 recent homicides linked to users of Stormfront white supremacist site, SPLC says


acatnamedhercules:

A white supremacist charged with killing three people near two Jewish community facilities in suburban Kansas City this week posted more than 12,000 messages on a racist website which carries the slogan “No Jews, Just Right,” according to an organization that tracks hate groups.

The online activity by Frazier Glenn Cross follows a trend in which prolific posters on hate online forums are becoming “disproportionately responsible” for racist murders and mass killings, according to a report released on Thursday by the Southern Poverty Law Center, a non-profit civil rights organization.

The report said nearly 100 people in the last five years have been murdered by frequent users of one white supremacist website, Stormfront. The site describes itself as a community of “White Nationalists” and “the voice of the new, embattled White minority.”

“It has been a magnet for the deadly and deranged,” said Heidi Beirich, author of the report.

This is part of what gets me about the whole anti-SJW thing, because one of their big talking points is that “reverse racism is just as bad! heterophobia is just as bad!” etc. So if we’re supposedly as bad as literal Nazis, then why aren’t TumblrInAction et al antagonizing, say, Stormfront members? Because they realize on some level that an angry trans person saying “I hate cis people” poses 0 actual threat to them, whereas pissing off a neo-Nazi could get them killed.

Meanwhile, POC, Jewish people, and queer people piss off neo-Nazis just by existing. But “anti-SJWs” who are supposedly for “real justice” won’t stand up against that. Apparently “real justice” can be carried out without any risk of consequences to one’s self.

(Source: ethiopienne, via strugglingtobeheard)

“There’s a paradox in thinking that you’re better than other girls, when your whole reason for feeling that way is because you think your gender is so inherently inferior that you want to dis-identify with being a girl altogether.”

More Than Words: Tomboys R Us

THIS whenever some girl brags about being “one of the boys” or says something like “I’m not like other girls, I LOVE [stereotypically masculine thing].”

(via giraffodill)

(via untitledunidentifiedunfinished)

(Source: autostraddle.com, via manicpixiedreamqueen)

bikecommutergirl:

complexication:

cultureshift:

The top photo is the outside of an abortion clinic. The bottom photo is a Nazi gas chamber. Eerily similar, aren’t they? The biggest difference is that far more human beings have died inside of abortion clinics than ever died inside of gas chambers.

It’s time to stop the killing. Stand against human abortion. Stand for Life.

See the comparison from the inside.

Things you should not do: Compare abortion to the genocide of 11 million people during the Holocaust, gas chamber or otherwise.

"Those who relate [abortion] to the Holocaust prove that they do not know what the Holocaust was.” -Elie Wiesel, Holocaust Survivor

OP, you can fuck ALL THE WAY OFF.

(via manicpixiedreamqueen)

You and me both.

(Source: lovegoods, via manicpixiedreamqueen)

bribryontour:

This should be a book for kids.

(Source: akeeruh, via manicpixiedreamqueen)